Coronavirus

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Bren
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Post by Bren »

I'm sad to report that the COVID caught up with me. Last Wednesday I ate what turned out to be some very hot (to me) salsa that burned all the way down. It has given me fits for a week. Triggering a gag reflex on the regular, I initially thought part of it was my winter sore throat that hadn't reared its ugly head. But, when the body aches started yesterday I wasn't willing to chance it and my rapid test today was positive. I'm off work till the 29th.
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Catspaw
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Post by Catspaw »

Aww, I'm sorry to hear that, Bren. Good for you for getting tested to make sure you don't spread it to others. I hope that you only have mild symptoms and that you're back to good health soon.
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Bren
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Post by Bren »

Well, I have been on the other side of being contagious for about 2 weeks now. So far I've had 2 lingering affects. I get tired easily. Also, it has my eating habits all out of wack. Some foods don't taste right, and in some cases I can't eat much.
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Post by Catspaw »

I'm glad that you're mostly better, Bren! I hope that the other stuff goes away soon. The food one sounds annoying, and getting tired easily must make it very hard to work. :(
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jelly
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Post by jelly »

In past, this forum has always been a place for me to rant about stronger feelings that I'm too meek to post on social media... permit me this continued indulgence. :P

My family has always had a conservative/anti-government lean, but my grandparents were doctors, and so we were medically informed. I remember hearing about weird "anti-vax" outliers in the homeschool community growing up, and that very concept never made sense to me; I just assumed it was some very fringe thing and never gave it any thought.

Fast forward a bunch of years and I'm finding it impossible to resist a growing mental fixation on what on earth is happening inside the heads of friends and acquaintances that I would otherwise call very level-headed, wonderful people. I can't stop thinking about my wife's best friend who thinks the vaccine will make her infertile (I'm seeing this particular falsehood more and more often). I can't stop obsessing over how on earth my buddy's mental priorities can be ordered in such a way that a marginal loss of "personal freedom" is somehow of greater concern than the reality of friends and family becoming deathly ill.

What is the root of this? Is it simply fear of the unknown? (People without medical degrees hearing falsehoods about things they don't personally understand anything about?) Mixed in with an underlying mistrust of practically any governmental authority?

Up here in rural, western Canada people are starting to inanely compare proof of vaccination cards with racial segregation orchestrated by Nazi Germany. It makes me cringe just writing that, and it makes me want to cry if I think about it too long. How can anyone have such a depreciated value of actual history or reality?

If you're out there and you can answer any of these questions for me... be a hero. I'm tired of thinking about it all so much. :(
Fallacy of false continuum. // bookworm
Any cupcake can be made holy through being baptized in the name of the Butter, the Vanilla and the Powdered Sugar. // Kait
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Catspaw
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Post by Catspaw »

I hear you, jelly, on a number of things. It is hard to look at someone who has so many wonderful qualities and wonder exactly what they are thinking and how they got so far from widely accepted medical advice. I always try to remember that people have reasons for what they believe, and even if they don't make sense to me, they make sense to that person. For some people I know, they have past family history (a few generations back) of religious persecution, which is why their ancestors came to Canada, and they seem to be very sensitive to any perceived infringements on their freedoms. I can respect where they're coming from; however, I can't agree with their conclusions and choices that can potentially impact so many lives. I agree that any kind of comparison between the Holocaust and temporarily not being allowed to eat in a restaurant are troubling.

Sorry, that didn't answer any of your questions - just a note from a fellow Canadian saying you're not alone.

For a lighter take on the issue, I enjoyed this Daily Bonnet article! I assume that most (all?) ToOers are not familiar with the site, so just to be clear - it is a Mennonite satire site. It is often hilarious; it is not "real news."
https://dailybonnet.com/new-edition-of- ... an-church/
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jelly
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Post by jelly »

Catspaw wrote: Sat Sep 18, 2021 8:36 pm For some people I know, they have past family history (a few generations back) of religious persecution, which is why their ancestors came to Canada, and they seem to be very sensitive to any perceived infringements on their freedoms.
This awareness helped me a lot when having a difficult conversation the other day with someone with a Mennonite heritage. I think it's easy for me as someone who had little difficulty parting ways with some of my parent's beliefs and "figuring things out for myself" to balk at people that are still tied to that older, traumatic mindset, but it was good to have a conversation with someone who is still strongly influenced by their parents and grandparents worldview (for very good reasons!) and understand why this matter of getting vaccinated was tied to a much deeper emotional conflict.
Catspaw wrote: Sat Sep 18, 2021 8:36 pmSorry, that didn't answer any of your questions - just a note from a fellow Canadian saying you're not alone.
Thank you Catspaw. :hug: I'm honestly very grateful, especially since I know you historically keep your own opinions out of potentially controversial topics.
Fallacy of false continuum. // bookworm
Any cupcake can be made holy through being baptized in the name of the Butter, the Vanilla and the Powdered Sugar. // Kait
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Post by Catspaw »

jelly wrote: Mon Sep 27, 2021 11:57 am
Catspaw wrote: Sat Sep 18, 2021 8:36 pm For some people I know, they have past family history (a few generations back) of religious persecution, which is why their ancestors came to Canada, and they seem to be very sensitive to any perceived infringements on their freedoms.
This awareness helped me a lot when having a difficult conversation the other day with someone with a Mennonite heritage. I think it's easy for me as someone who had little difficulty parting ways with some of my parent's beliefs and "figuring things out for myself" to balk at people that are still tied to that older, traumatic mindset, but it was good to have a conversation with someone who is still strongly influenced by their parents and grandparents worldview (for very good reasons!) and understand why this matter of getting vaccinated was tied to a much deeper emotional conflict.
I'm glad that perspective was a helpful lens for you. I think some people are not even aware that some of their reactions may stem from things unrelated to the actual issue but past trauma or past generational trauma. I try to understand or respect where someone is coming from, and separate that from agreement with the actual view or reaction. Not saying I do it perfectly but for me it helps.
jelly wrote: Mon Sep 27, 2021 11:57 am
Catspaw wrote: Sat Sep 18, 2021 8:36 pmSorry, that didn't answer any of your questions - just a note from a fellow Canadian saying you're not alone.
Thank you Catspaw. :hug: I'm honestly very grateful, especially since I know you historically keep your own opinions out of potentially controversial topics.
No problem. Maybe sometimes I've been too risk-averse. I could really relate to your post and just had to share that. :hug:
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